JÓZSEF BULLÁS: TIMEWHEEL

On View: 2018. 11. 29 – 2019. 01. 26.

Opening: 2018. 11. 29., Thursday, 7pm

Opening speech by: Zsolt Petrányi, art historian, the head of contemporary arts in the Hungarian National Gallery

 

The Erika Deák Gallery is delighted to announce its season closing exhibition, TIMEWHEEL, where we celebrate two important dates, JÓZSEF BULLÁS’s 60th, and the gallery’s 20th birthday!

József Bullás started his career in the 80’s in the school of the so called new painting. He began as a figurative painter, but his turn toward geometry, to simple ornaments and forms became soon apparent. His trips to the East were determining, his ever since ruling elements, the turning lines and the shaped ornaments were inspired there. At the start of his career he emphasized specific features and motifs, later it was the brushwork itself that became the central element. Bullás has always attempted to widen the boundaries of structures and repetitive systems, and give our eyes the richness of spectacle beyond perception. It doesn’t mean that he repeats motifs or patterns, but creates multidimensional, reversibly virtual spaces, painted with traditional techniques. He thinks art requires a continuous re-interpretation. His position is as of a classicist, he paints with oil, acrylic on canvas, and believes he needs to be connected to the reality and essence of painting, using his hands and whole body in the process of working. He concentrates on the classic problems of painting, such as composition and space, perception and illusion, but as well questions the nature of perception int he 21st century. As he says: „the painting is a slice of reality, which can be continued in any direction.”

The exhibition attempts to show the richness of his ouvre, by selecting some of the most emblematic works from 1980s until today.

József Bullás was born in 1958, in Zalaegerszeg. He got the prominent Munkacsy-prize in 2008. He finished his studies at the Hungarian Academy of Arts in 1984. He had numerous exhibitions in some of the most important galleries and museums in Hungary and abroad, such as the XVIII. Sao Paulo Biennial or Ars Electronica in Linz. His works can be found in the Saint Stephen King Museum, Székesfehérvár, in the Modern Gallery Szombathely, in the Hungarian National Gallery, Budapest, the Ludwig Museum, Budapest, or in the Neue Gallery, Graz.